nextgenedu, next generation education, alternative learning, alternative learning programs near me, improving education, advanced education, education programs, education information, University level strategy, Technology in school, technology and curriculum development, Student motivation, alternative learning, early career discovery, tedx ocala keynote, education economy, keynote speaking, NextGenEdu, Ocala, Florida

Ocala, Florida nextgenedu, next generation education, alternative learning, alternative learning programs near me, improving education, advanced education, education programs, education information, University level strategy, Technology in school, technology and curriculum development, Student motivation, alternative learning, early career discovery, tedx ocala keynote, education economy, keynote speaking,

Ocala, Florida nextgenedu, next generation education, alternative learning, alternative learning programs near me, improving education, advanced education, education programs, education information, University level strategy, Technology in school, technology and curriculum development, Student motivation, alternative learning, early career discovery, tedx ocala keynote, education economy, keynote speaking,

We help educational institutions adapt to the rapidly changing landscape driven by technology.

Learn More

Our presentation at the SBAA 2018 Annual Meeting



SBAA Logo

During our presentation at the SBAA meeting, we discussed the current stressors for colleges in the modern day and some potential solutions that would not only alleviate that stress but help to improve these institutions of higher learning and better prepare them for the change that is the future of education.

Link to SBAA Talk

Check out our talk from the 2017 TEDx Ocala



TEDx Ocala Logo

The current education system was built with the economics of the 19th century but has many failings when applied for the 21st century. In this talk, we discuss the fundamental economic drivers for today's educational system as well as two very important actions required to bring it into the 21st century...

K-12 Education Policy Brief

(01/18/2019) Executive Summary:K-12 education is at the bedrock of the American education system and today, it is struggling. All the players (students, teachers, parents, government officials)  have benevolent intentions, but the critical drivers for this lack of success are often misunderstood. Further, the bureaucracies involved are so large that any meaningful change is difficult and of course, the political considerations make the process of change even more difficult.   In this policy brief, we discuss the current education system, its inherent limitations, and then propose three very specific policy remedies which provide a mechanism for fundamental change.  These three policy imperatives are:Funding: Funding must follow the child and not institutions.  Certification:  Certification must be independent of method of delivery.Facilities:  Facilities and Academic Function must operate independently.The implementation of these policies will have the following positive outcomes:Academic Services Marketplace: A richer marketplace will be enabled which can focus on driving down cost while raising quality.  Student Choice:  Students and their parents will have much greater choice in accessing the intellectual assets offered from the world. Local Resource Optimization:  With this structure, there will be a much greater optimization of local physical assets.While this policy brief focuses on K-12 education, these bedrock policy principles have clear applications for post-secondary education, career services, and employment training.   Finally, we observe that Gov Jeb Bush’s foundation, Foundation for Excellence, is the closest in advocating policy changes aligned with this point-of-view. Background:Economic Underpinnings:The fundamental structure of the public education system is built on the three core ideas:Teacher:  The teacher is the knowledge bearer and is a scarce resource.Classroom:  The transfer of knowledge happens in a physical setting called a classroom and that is also a scarce resource.Craftsmen Model:  The method of knowledge transfer is a craftsman like model owned by the teacher. As discussed in our TEDx talk and on articles at website (www.nextgenedu.net), when these economic structures were true, the current structure of the education system is a reasonable response. However, todayTeacher:  large parts of the teaching task can be automated to make the teacher much much more productive. Classroom:  With virtualization, the classroom is no longer a scarce resource. In fact, any student with a cell phone can have access to quality instruction.Craftsmen Model:  The craftsmen model can be significantly improved with the capture of process IP, instruction IP, data mining, and  science of learning innovation. This is no different than any other sector which optimizes its processes to improve quality of service while reducing cost. In fact, viable models for alternative education structures exist with schools such as FLVS, WGU, and others.  With these structures, a competency based virtually delivered education model has been built such that all aspects of the education system can be improved. In addition, these models can take advantage of economies of scale in a way not possible for the current structure.   Impediments to Progress:Assuming all players have the best interests of the students in mind (a good assumption),  what are the impediments to progress?In any large bureaucratic system, the elements of the system never want to change. In this context, teachers, like all human beings, are resistant to change. For most veteran teachers, the incremental cost of teaching a class using the method next year is fairly low.  Teaching the class in a new manner incurs a large incremental cost. Thus, there is no incentive to make this investment at the local level. In addition, education is the rare profession where people enter the profession because of their good experiences as a child. Thus, they reinforce a backward looking structure because this is the reason they entered the profession.  This is unique to education. Similarly, administrators are resistant to change and structures such as unions freeze the current processes by building contract structures around them.  We observe that this is no different than any industry. After all, Sears really did not want to change. Rather, the core question is what form of change needs to take place and how does one enable its creation. The nature of the impediments to structural change can be placed in three categories:  role of teachers, role of school administration, and certification/funding. Role of Teachers: The "craftsman" model is the current "gold standard."  This is a model where the quality/cost are totally determined by the individual teacher. Thus, there is great variability in quality and cost is tied explicitly to individuals. The fundamental shift which needs to occur is a movement of role of teachers from the owner of the classroom to being part of a coordinated team which is part of the solution.  In this evolution of the teaching model, there is a great deal of process IP, instruction IP, specialized resources, and in fact, different types of teachers involved. Through automation, teachers can enable mass customization connected to the uniqueness of students. This is a massive shift in role for teachers.   Role of School Administration:  Currently, the school administration which owns the academic function also owns facilities, cafeteria services, athletic services, and security. This structure builds a stack of capabilities which effectively covers up the warts on the academic function side.  As an example, the realistic alternative for most parents is to home school their children, yet with this approach, they incur the added costs of providing these other services. This is the same choice presented to a charter school which has to build a full stack of capabilities. Currently, this is not a level playing field for the alternatives.  Certification/Funding:   Whether it is the local school board or the federal government, nearly all the current funding sources for education are based on concepts such as course hours (not competence) and semesters (based on an outdated agrarian calendar.).  Funding should be tied to competence and an independent certification structure is required to enable both funding and alternative models of delivery.Policy Proposals and Analysis:We propose three simple bedrock policy principles which over time will enable better outcomes for students, teachers, and parents.  These are focused on funding, certification, and facilities. Starting with the topic of facilities management,  today, school buildings management, cafeteria operation, security  are all managed by academic administration. This does not make much sense at two levels.  First and most importantly, it ties one and only one academic function to the physical assets of the school.  Also, traditional educators have no training in these other matters. Let us imagine a different decomposition with a facilities management function which is explicitly separated from the academic function and operates independently.  The facilities function offers all the physically connected services such as security, athletics, cafeteria services, IT, transportation, and more. The current academic function simply rents space from the physical assets much like a company leases space from a commercial real estate company.  The decomposition has several important properties:A professional facilities function is much more capable of handling the core issues such as security and can focus on the optimal utilization of these assets.The facilities function can rent to multiple academic players..including other charter schools as well as virtual schools desiring local physical access. The facilities function can optimize utilization of space with usage from purposes ranging from corporate training to parks/recreation.   Most importantly, this decomposition flattens the playing field and enables a great deal of freedom for a competitive marketplace. Examples include:Imagine a situation where home school parents can drop off kids at the local school  into a room full of computers. Security, Cafeteria services, and perhaps a bit of general coaching is provided by the facilities mgmt function.Imagine cultural and racial tensions being reduced because African American parents can have access to top-flight k-12 education developed and delivered by places such as Moorhouse College.Imagine the world’s best schools enabled at delivering their capabilities to every american parent.  Enabling this marketplace of alternatives is critical to build a process which can change or replace the current educational system. It can also do so at a rate commensurate with the value perceived by students and their parents. To further enable this marketplace, an independent certification structure must be built. For students, this structure must focus on competence independent of method of delivery. For schools, it must focus on outcome based metrics which allow parents/students to make informed choices for alternatives. Finally, the funding must follow the student.   Conclusions:K-12 education is a large and important part of the American educational system. Currently, the system has very fixed (even frozen) process to deliver education services which are then enabled by funding, certification, and unionization.  These forces have been created a Gordian knot which has not allowed the system to progress in terms of absorbing innovation and technology. In terms of policy,  three specific policy imperatives around funding, certification, and facilities management were proposed. The purpose of these policy statements is to enable an academic services marketplace, enable true student choice, and optimization of local physical resources.  Finally, we observe that Gov Jeb Bush’s foundation, Foundation for Excellence, is the closest in advocating policy changes aligned with this point-of-view. BiographyRahul has over 25 years experience in startups, academia, and Fortune 500 companies. In academia, he has worked in areas such as STEM education, Autonomous Vehicle Technology, and SemiConductor Design. He has successfully led a number of startups (WiPower, PwrLite, Ocoos) and held senior corporate roles at Cadence and DEC (HP now). He has authored numerous technical papers, is named on over 24 issued patents, and has a Ph.D. from Harvard University (M.S./B.S. from Carnegie Mellon University).  He is the CEO of Next Gen Education (nextgenedu.net).

What can Linux teach us about managing...

(02/16/2018) Linux is a free and open-source software operating system. One might reasonably ask the question: So, what does this have to do with instruction materials for a class? As it turns out, quite a bit. Before making this argument, we should provide some background on the history of Linux.Linux was born in a world of proprietary operating systems (remember OS2, Sun OS, and others?) These operating systems provided the interface between hardware developers and application software developers. The proprietary nature of the operating systems did not allow either of these entities to innovate at the rate required. In 1991, Linux was introduced as an open-source platform and soon grew in popularity. Today, Linux has significant market share in the commercial landscape, and in fact, the Linux ecosystem is larger than anything any single company (e.g. IBM) or country (e.g. China) can build. This begs the question: What makes Linux (or any open-source) successful?The lesson of open-source systems such as Linux (WordPress, Apache, etc.) is that when enabled by an open collaboration environment, a community can build, debug and innovate at a rate much faster than any single entity. The key aspects to enable this collaborative environment are: Unbiased Orchestrator: There is a need for an unbiased and knowledgeable individual who manages the contributions of the collective. In the case of Linux, this was the group led by Linus Torvalds.Open-Source License Terms: Contributions must be available to the whole community and there should be no barriers to access.Value-Added Services: For those who are not in the community, value-added services are very beneficial in providing access to the broader market. This also affords a method to monetize and fund the core elements of the community. Red Hat became an example of this aspect of the system for Linux. For all the constituents, this environment provided a win-win situation. For hardware and software developers, they could incrementally enable their solutions on a mainline operating system. A number of innovations coming from academia and industry could also be easily added to the system. Finally, even for the proprietary OS developers, Linux provided them a way of gaining revenue through value-added services, while the baseline was debugged (literally) by the world. Thus, at some point, IBM embraced Linux.As we have discussed in previous articles (HERE) or the TED Talk (HERE), the current educational system largely views students as commodities into which knowledge is poured; which can be likened to an industrial manufacturing process. The fundamental structure of the current model is driven by an economic imperative from the last century -- based on the premise of the scarcity of the instructor and classroom -- which is no longer true. Also, the actual process of teaching occurs in a craftsman-like model which has not changed for hundreds of years.Let's consider the impact of an open-source collaborative environment in the context of something like a calculus class. Today, the delivery of these classes consists of a book, various disorganized YouTube videos and a teacher in the classroom performing for the students. Even with automation and content from the internet, it is a maddeningly inefficient process. Consider the following structure: Unbiased Orchestrator: A non-profit entity such as a university would host and manage the process of submissions. It would provide a basis structure for the calculus class such as table-of-contents, login privs, search and others.Open Source Licensing Terms: Contributors such as other universities, industry and even students could contribute unique and interesting ways of teaching and assessing calculus.Value-Added Services: Teaching institutions could license the base and build value-added services on top to deliver to the broader marketplace. Let’s consider the power of this community approach vs. the current system: Teaching Styles: Today, a teacher can deliver one style of teaching — their own. With this system, various styles of teaching (humorous, visual, auditory, language specific, etc.) can be easily built on a core. Further, the value of the core rises over time.Industry/Application Input: Today, a teacher has little capability to include “real-life” examples into the lesson. With this system, industrial examples could easily be added by interested parties.Debugging/Improvement: Today, once a textbook is published or a teacher has delivered the lecture, it is done; finished. In this system, there is a constant process of capture and improvement. Want to build a Chatbot to help teach? One would be able to do that in an innovative system. Overall, the introduction of open-source instruction IP can harness the broader community. It has the potential to enrich the student experience in a way not possible by any single institution — much less any particular professor. .pull-right{text-align: right; font-size: 22px; margin-bottom: 10px; display: block;}.Article-btn{font-size: 22px; padding: 10px 18px; width: 200px; display: block; margin: 20px auto; color: #FFF; text-align: center; background-color: #EE3623; text-decoration: none;}.Article-btn:hover{-webkit-animation: jello-horizontal 0.9s both; animation: jello-horizontal 0.9s both; text-decoration: none; color: #FFF;}.Blog-fix p, .Blog-fix ul, .Blog-fix li, .Blog-fix ol{font-size: 17px; font-family: 'Cabin', sans-serif; padding-bottom: 15px;}.Blog-fix ol, .Blog-fix ul{padding-left: 30px;}.Blog-fix h1, .Blog-fix h2, .Blog-fix h3{font-family: 'Questrial', sans-serif; padding-bottom: 15px;}.Blog-fix h1{font-size: 36px;}.Blog-fix h2{font-size: 32px;}.Blog-fix h3{font-size: 25px;}.Blog-fix img{width: 480px; margin: 15px auto; display: block;}.text-center{text-align: center;}/*----------------------------Animation--------------------------------*/ @-webkit-keyframes rotate-vert-center{0%{-webkit-transform: rotateY(0); transform: rotateY(0);}100%{-webkit-transform: rotateY(360deg); transform: rotateY(360deg);}}@keyframes rotate-vert-center{0%{-webkit-transform: rotateY(0); transform: rotateY(0);}100%{-webkit-transform: rotateY(360deg); transform: rotateY(360deg);}}@-webkit-keyframes flip-vertical-left{0%{-webkit-transform: rotateY(0); transform: rotateY(0);}100%{-webkit-transform: rotateY(-180deg); transform: rotateY(-180deg);}}@keyframes flip-vertical-left{0%{-webkit-transform: rotateY(0); transform: rotateY(0);}100%{-webkit-transform: rotateY(-180deg); transform: rotateY(-180deg);}}@-webkit-keyframes shake-bottom{0%, 100%{-webkit-transform: rotate(0deg); transform: rotate(0deg); -webkit-transform-origin: 50% 100%; transform-origin: 50% 100%;}10%{-webkit-transform: rotate(2deg); transform: rotate(2deg);}20%, 40%, 60%{-webkit-transform: rotate(-4deg); transform: rotate(-4deg);}30%, 50%, 70%{-webkit-transform: rotate(4deg); transform: rotate(4deg);}80%{-webkit-transform: rotate(-2deg); transform: rotate(-2deg);}90%{-webkit-transform: rotate(2deg); transform: rotate(2deg);}}@keyframes shake-bottom{0%, 100%{-webkit-transform: rotate(0deg); transform: rotate(0deg); -webkit-transform-origin: 50% 100%; transform-origin: 50% 100%;}10%{-webkit-transform: rotate(2deg); transform: rotate(2deg);}20%, 40%, 60%{-webkit-transform: rotate(-4deg); transform: rotate(-4deg);}30%, 50%, 70%{-webkit-transform: rotate(4deg); transform: rotate(4deg);}80%{-webkit-transform: rotate(-2deg); transform: rotate(-2deg);}90%{-webkit-transform: rotate(2deg); transform: rotate(2deg);}}@-webkit-keyframes shadow-drop-center{0%{-webkit-box-shadow: 0 0 0 0 transparent; box-shadow: 0 0 0 0 transparent}100%{-webkit-box-shadow: 0 0 20px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, .35); box-shadow: 0 0 20px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, .35)}}@keyframes shadow-drop-center{0%{-webkit-box-shadow: 0 0 0 0 transparent; box-shadow: 0 0 0 0 transparent}100%{-webkit-box-shadow: 0 0 20px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, .35); box-shadow: 0 0 20px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, .35)}}@-webkit-keyframes slide-in-elliptic-top-fwd{0%{-webkit-transform: translateY(-600px) rotateX(-30deg) scale(0); transform: translateY(-600px) rotateX(-30deg) scale(0); -webkit-transform-origin: 50% 100%; transform-origin: 50% 100%; opacity: 0}100%{-webkit-transform: translateY(0) rotateX(0) scale(1); transform: translateY(0) rotateX(0) scale(1); -webkit-transform-origin: 50% 1400px; transform-origin: 50% 1400px; opacity: 1}}@keyframes slide-in-elliptic-top-fwd{0%{-webkit-transform: translateY(-600px) rotateX(-30deg) scale(0); transform: translateY(-600px) rotateX(-30deg) scale(0); -webkit-transform-origin: 50% 100%; transform-origin: 50% 100%; opacity: 0}100%{-webkit-transform: translateY(0) rotateX(0) scale(1); transform: translateY(0) rotateX(0) scale(1); -webkit-transform-origin: 50% 1400px; transform-origin: 50% 1400px; opacity: 1}}@-webkit-keyframes tracking-in-expand-fwd{0%{letter-spacing: -.5em; -webkit-transform: translateZ(-700px); transform: translateZ(-700px); opacity: 0}40%{opacity: .6}100%{-webkit-transform: translateZ(0); transform: translateZ(0); opacity: 1}}@keyframes tracking-in-expand-fwd{0%{letter-spacing: -.5em; -webkit-transform: translateZ(-700px); transform: translateZ(-700px); opacity: 0}40%{opacity: .6}100%{-webkit-transform: translateZ(0); transform: translateZ(0); opacity: 1}}@-webkit-keyframes jello-horizontal{0%{-webkit-transform: scale3d(1, 1, 1); transform: scale3d(1, 1, 1)}30%{-webkit-transform: scale3d(1.25, .75, 1); transform: scale3d(1.25, .75, 1)}40%{-webkit-transform: scale3d(.75, 1.25, 1); transform: scale3d(.75, 1.25, 1)}50%{-webkit-transform: scale3d(1.15, .85, 1); transform: scale3d(1.15, .85, 1)}65%{-webkit-transform: scale3d(.95, 1.05, 1); transform: scale3d(.95, 1.05, 1)}75%{-webkit-transform: scale3d(1.05, .95, 1); transform: scale3d(1.05, .95, 1)}100%{-webkit-transform: scale3d(1, 1, 1); transform: scale3d(1, 1, 1)}}@keyframes jello-horizontal{0%{-webkit-transform: scale3d(1, 1, 1); transform: scale3d(1, 1, 1)}30%{-webkit-transform: scale3d(1.25, .75, 1); transform: scale3d(1.25, .75, 1)}40%{-webkit-transform: scale3d(.75, 1.25, 1); transform: scale3d(.75, 1.25, 1)}50%{-webkit-transform: scale3d(1.15, .85, 1); transform: scale3d(1.15, .85, 1)}65%{-webkit-transform: scale3d(.95, 1.05, 1); transform: scale3d(.95, 1.05, 1)}75%{-webkit-transform: scale3d(1.05, .95, 1); transform: scale3d(1.05, .95, 1)}100%{-webkit-transform: scale3d(1, 1, 1); transform: scale3d(1, 1, 1)}}.rotate-vert-center{-webkit-animation: rotate-vert-center 0.5s cubic-bezier(0.455, 0.030, 0.515, 0.955) both; animation: rotate-vert-center 0.5s cubic-bezier(0.455, 0.030, 0.515, 0.955) both;}.flip-vertical-left{-webkit-animation: flip-vertical-left 0.4s cubic-bezier(0.455, 0.030, 0.515, 0.955) both; animation: flip-vertical-left 0.4s cubic-bezier(0.455, 0.030, 0.515, 0.955) both;}.shake-bottom{-webkit-animation: shake-bottom 0.8s cubic-bezier(0.455, 0.030, 0.515, 0.955) both; animation: shake-bottom 0.8s cubic-bezier(0.455, 0.030, 0.515, 0.955) both;}.jello-horizontal{-webkit-animation: jello-horizontal 0.9s both; animation: jello-horizontal 0.9s both;}.shadow-drop-center{-webkit-animation: shadow-drop-center 0.4s cubic-bezier(0.250, 0.460, 0.450, 0.940) both; animation: shadow-drop-center 0.4s cubic-bezier(0.250, 0.460, 0.450, 0.940) both;}.slide-in-elliptic-top-fwd{-webkit-animation: slide-in-elliptic-top-fwd 0.7s cubic-bezier(0.250, 0.460, 0.450, 0.940) both; animation: slide-in-elliptic-top-fwd 0.7s cubic-bezier(0.250, 0.460, 0.450, 0.940) both;}.tracking-in-expand-fwd{-webkit-animation: tracking-in-expand-fwd 0.8s cubic-bezier(0.215, 0.610, 0.355, 1.000) both; animation: tracking-in-expand-fwd 0.8s cubic-bezier(0.215, 0.610, 0.355, 1.000) both;}

Companies that Recommend NextGenEdu